Cloud Warrior Story- The High Cost of Old School Thinking About Small Business Marketing

Cloud Warrior Shares Revealing Story About High Cost of Old School Thinking for Small Business Marketing Results

Last week I coined a new phrase for people like me who work online every day and leverage the sheer power of cloud computing. There are millions of small business owners, professionals and others who leverage cloud computing every day. Some of us take it for granted. True Cloud Warriors do not. Especially when it comes to small business marketing.

Here’s a story that reveals how costly it is for a small business owner to “get stuck” in old school thinking when it comes to small business marketing success and results.

The short version is that a father and son are deliberating the value of online marketing for the future success of their business. They work together. The father is the founder. The son drives the marketing and most of their marketing takes place in the cloud.

The data the son brings in to the father reveals that the single biggest driver of new business is their online marketing. The stuff they do in the cl0ud such as pay per click advertising, blogging, and marketing automation with Infusionsoft.

The son is building a case for investing more in their online marketing. The father is arguing against it.

Why? My interpretation of what happened here is this. The father is somewhat old school in his thinking. Despite the data the son delivers to him, the father “feels” it makes more sense to invest in other areas to grow the business. Yet the son has built a convincing case to the contrary. The father ignores the facts.

To be honest, I am oversimplify here. I wasn’t privy to their conversation. I heard the son’s side of the story. Yet in listening carefully to the son, I share the following “lessons learned” with you.

1. You need data to make informed decisions on small business marketing and sales investments. Too many people shoot from the hip based on their paradigm of thinking.

2. A true Cloud Warrior will focus on investing in the small business marketing that gets the best results. It’s not about the technology. It’s about the marketing, sales and financial results tied to data.

3. Being married to old school thinking and ignoring compelling data is expensive for a small business. Really expensive. In fact, this shortsighted kind of thinking leads to disaster often. And it happens all the time due to resistance to learning how to work as a Cloud Warrior.

4. If you own a business and choose not to learn about the power of cloud computing, Websites, traffic, lead gen, conversions and marketing automation, you are simply doing your business and your employees a huge disservice. Get on the bus!

I don’t think I will be able to help this particular business through their dilemma, for a number of reasons. My only hope here is that the father chooses to get out of his own way and let the son drive the future investment in marketing and sales with compelling data.

We always welcome your comments and questions here on the blog.

To your success.

About the Author

I am Cliff Jones. I'm on a mission to teach and coach CEO's, business owners, sales and marketing executives how to use my Digital Marketing Action Plan (DMAP) to get high-ROI sales and marketing results in less time with much less stress. Connect with me: Twitter Facebook Linkedin Youtube

Leave a Reply 6 comments

Tina Tegano Rogers Reply

Shortly after college I was that "daughter" working in my fathers' founded business. I had the same challenges circa 1990. What I finally discovered, after many hard discussions and disagreements with dear old Dad, that fear was the underlying cause of his concerns. To these old school guys who are used to doing business on a cocktail napkin and a handshake, computers, the internet and the cloud are certainly unknown entities to them, hence the fear. It is not only unfamiliar to them, but it is a daily reminder that they, as the patriarch of the family business, are also getting older and fear that they themselves are becoming obsolete to the younger, more technology savvy crowd. Just my two cents from experience.
Tina Rogers – BrainStorm.

Tina Tegano Rogers Reply

Shortly after college I was that “daughter” working in my fathers’ founded business. I had the same challenges circa 1990. What I finally discovered, after many hard discussions and disagreements with dear old Dad, that fear was the underlying cause of his concerns. To these old school guys who are used to doing business on a cocktail napkin and a handshake, computers, the internet and the cloud are certainly unknown entities to them, hence the fear. It is not only unfamiliar to them, but it is a daily reminder that they, as the patriarch of the family business, are also getting older and fear that they themselves are becoming obsolete to the younger, more technology savvy crowd. Just my two cents from experience.
Tina Rogers – BrainStorm.

Leslie Knowlton Reply

Great post Cliff. Good points and you got me thinking (as usual). Thanks for sharing this experience and I appreciate your honesty about the source of this story because the details are important. Our resistance to change and devotion to our beliefs makes embracing something new a challenge. Married to old school thinking comes from a well of experiences and various stories in our heads of successes and failures.

I appreciate what Tina has added about the face-to-face negotiation that her dad remembers and believes in. Engaging with potential clients with the stories you tell on line will lead to many many more of those lunches about hunches and negotiations and contracts on napkins in the end.

I would add a few more words to your list in number 2 – A Cloud Warrior (like this!) engages through stories and conversations (almost the same as marketing, but two-way).

Leslie Knowlton, SuddenlyHeard.

Conversion Marketing Experts, LLC Reply

Tina, GREAT points you make. Could not agree more. Leslie, I just had lunch with our oldest son, Chris. He worked for me last year, for a while. I must admit that my beliefs probably got in the way of us working effectively together. My old school thinking had more to do with work ethic and approach to learning the business, as opposed to resisting of technology, given our business model. Any way, it was a great learning experience for both of us. And my lesson learned is I need to not resist learning new points of view from anyone. I need to listen, test, learn and adapt. Thanks to both of you for great comments.

Leslie Knowlton Reply

Great post Cliff. Good points and you got me thinking (as usual). Thanks for sharing this experience and I appreciate your honesty about the source of this story because the details are important. Our resistance to change and devotion to our beliefs makes embracing something new a challenge. Married to old school thinking comes from a well of experiences and various stories in our heads of successes and failures.

I appreciate what Tina has added about the face-to-face negotiation that her dad remembers and believes in. Engaging with potential clients with the stories you tell on line will lead to many many more of those lunches about hunches and negotiations and contracts on napkins in the end.

I would add a few more words to your list in number 2 – A Cloud Warrior (like this!) engages through stories and conversations (almost the same as marketing, but two-way).

Leslie Knowlton, SuddenlyHeard.

Conversion Marketing Experts, LLC Reply

Tina, GREAT points you make. Could not agree more. Leslie, I just had lunch with our oldest son, Chris. He worked for me last year, for a while. I must admit that my beliefs probably got in the way of us working effectively together. My old school thinking had more to do with work ethic and approach to learning the business, as opposed to resisting of technology, given our business model. Any way, it was a great learning experience for both of us. And my lesson learned is I need to not resist learning new points of view from anyone. I need to listen, test, learn and adapt. Thanks to both of you for great comments.

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